HEALTH SECTOR IS YOUR THING? PHYSIO THERAPISTS ON THE BOOM.

HEALTH SECTOR IS YOUR THING? PHYSIO THERAPISTS ON THE BOOM.

So, someone said: an I had to go to Physio… well, we heard that before or been there ourselves. Physio is an interesting path and can be developed into many different areas, you can work as an individual or as part of surgery their plenty of options. If you never been to physiotherapy you might ask yourself what are they actually doing?

This role might involve helping patients with spine and joint problems, especially after an operation; helping patients recovering from accidents, sports injuries, and strokes; working with children who have mental or physical disabilities, and helping older people with physical problems become more mobile.

Physiotherapists work in various areas and departments, such as pediatrics, outpatients, intensive care, women’s health and occupational health. They use a variety of treatments and techniques,
including:


 physical manipulation
 massage
 therapeutic exercise
 electrotherapy
 ultrasound
 acupuncture
 hydrotherapySo, someone said: I had to go to Physio… well, we heard that before or been there ourselves.

Physio is an interesting path and can be developed into many different areas, you can work as an individual or as part of surgery their plenty of options.

If you never been to physiotherapy you might ask yourself what are they actually doing?

This role might involve helping patients with spine and joint problems, especially after an operation; helping patients recovering from accidents, sports injuries, and strokes; working with children who have mental or physical disabilities, and helping older people with physical problems become more mobile.

Physiotherapists work in various areas and departments, such as pediatrics, outpatients, intensive care, women’s health and occupational health. They use a variety of treatments and techniques, including:

  • physical manipulation
  • massage
  • therapeutic exercise
  • electrotherapy
  • ultrasound
  • acupuncture
  • hydrotherapy

Qualifications – Entry requirements

To get onto a physiotherapy degree course you usually need two or three A levels, including biological science and/or PE, along with five GCSEs (grades A-C), including English language, maths, and at least one science.

To practice as a physiotherapist, you must be registered with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). To register with the HCPC, you first need to successfully complete an approved degree level qualification in physiotherapy. This may be a full or part-time course or a degree apprenticeship in physiotherapy. Full-time degrees take three years. Part-time degrees vary from four to six years.

There are a few ways to go about this and some options include gaining on the job experience while you study. You could:

Enrol directly in a Bachelor degree through your local university, or Join a work experience program or apprenticeship and study while you obtain exposure in the industry, or secure a role as a part-time physiotherapy assistant and learn while you earn.

What’s next?

You will find most jobs in the NHS. However, you could also work with local authorities and in the private sector, at day centers, schools, hospices, care homes, fitness centers, and sports clinics, for example.

What can I expect, working as a physiotherapist or massage therapist?

Physiotherapy can be both interesting and rewarding. But there are also challenges. So, what else can you expect?

Back to back clients with minimal breaks – as a physiotherapist you will most likely have clients booked back to back and you won’t have much downtime in between. This means that you must be organised with your paperwork, or you could end up taking work home at the end of the day.

Difficult customers – most of your clients will be suffering from injuries. Pain often causes other emotions, including anger and frustration. Unfortunately, this anger and frustration are often taken out on healthcare professionals, so you will need to be able to flex your resilience muscle.

Take a deep breath and remember they come to you because they seek help.

Safety first – as a healthcare professional, you always need to put your client’s health and safety first. This includes the following protocols and making sure that you are only providing treatment and advice that is suitable for your client’s circumstances.

Immense gratitude  you are helping your clients gain pain relief, so expect there to be plenty of gratitude! This is one of the most rewarding parts of the job, so enjoy it!

Qualifications – Entry requirements
To get onto a physiotherapy degree course you usually need two or three A levels, including biological science and/or PE, along with five GCSEs (grades A-C), including English language, maths, and at least one science.

To practice as a physiotherapist, you must be registered with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). To register with the HCPC, you first need to successfully complete an approved degree level qualification in physiotherapy. This may be a full or part-time course or a degree apprenticeship in physiotherapy. Full-time degrees take three years. Part-time degrees vary from four to six years.

There are a few ways to go about this and some options include gaining on the job experience while you study. You could: Enroll directly in a Bachelor degree through your local university; Or Join a work experience program or apprenticeship and study while you obtain exposure in the industry; or secure a role as a part-time physiotherapy assistant and learn while you earn.

What’s next?
You will find most jobs in the NHS. However, you could also work with local authorities and in the private sector, at day centres, schools, hospices, care homes, fitness centres and sports clinics, for example.

What can I expect, working as a physiotherapist or massage therapist?
Physiotherapy can be both interesting and rewarding. But there are also challenges. So, what else can you expect?


Back to back clients with minimal breaks – as a physiotherapist you will most likely have clients booked back to back and you won’t have much downtime in between. This means that you must be organised with your paperwork, or you could end up taking work home at the end of the day.
Difficult customers – most of your clients will be suffering from injuries. Pain often causes other emotions, including anger and frustration. Unfortunately, this anger and frustration is often taken out on healthcare professionals, so you will need to be able to flex your resilience muscle.
Take a deep breath and remember they come to you because they seek help.


Safety first – as a healthcare professional, you always need to put your client’s health and safety first. This includes the following protocols and making sure that you are only providing treatment and advice that is suitable for your client’s circumstances. Immense gratitude – you are helping your clients gain pain relief, so expect there to be plenty of gratitude! This is one of the most rewarding parts of the job, so enjoy it!

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